Author: The Sonnets Of William Shakespeare { 1609 Quarto }

Poem By William Shakespeare

image

“Orphée charmant les animaux” (1740) By Artist François Boucher 

Orpheus with his lute made trees,
And the mountain tops that freeze,
Bow themselves, when he did sing:
To his music plants and flowers
Ever sprung; as sun and showers
There had made a lasting spring.

Everything that heard him play,
Even the billows of the sea,
Hung their heads, and then lay by.
In sweet music is such art,
Killing care and grief of heart
Fall asleep, or hearing, die. 

Poem by William Shakespeare

image

Springtime (1873) By Artist Pierre-Auguste Cot

IT was a lover and his lass,
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
That o’er the green corn-field did pass,
  In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding ;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

Between the acres of the rye,
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
These pretty country folks would lie,
  In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding ;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

This carol they began that hour,
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
How that life was but a flower
  In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding ;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

And, therefore, take the present time
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
For love is crown`d with the prime
In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding ;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

Poem by William Shakespeare

image

The Honeysuckle Bower (1609) By Artist Peter Paul Rubens

ROSES, their sharp spines being gone,
Not royal in their smells alone,
  But in their hue ;
Maiden pinks, of odour faint,
Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint,
  And sweet thyme true ;

Primrose, firstborn child of Ver ;
Merry springtime’s harbinger,
  With her bells dim ;
Oxlips in their cradles growing,
Marigolds on death-beds blowing,
  Larks’-heels trim ;

All dear Nature’s children sweet
Lie ‘fore bride and bridegroom’s feet,
  Blessing their sense !
Not an angel of the air,
Bird melodious or bird fair,
  Be absent hence !

The crow, the slanderous cuckoo, nor
The boding raven, nor chough hoar,
  Nor chattering pye,
May on our bride-house perch or sing,
Or with them any discord bring,
  But from it fly !

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act II, scene 1

image

Shakespeare’s Titania depicted by Edwin Landseer in his painting Scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, based on A Midsummer Night’s Dream act IV, scene I, with Bottom and fairies in attendance.

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire !
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon’s sphere ;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green ;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be ;
In their gold coats spots you see ;
Those be rubies, fairy favours ;
In those freckles live their savours ;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip’s ear.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act II, scene 1

image

Shakespeare’s Titania depicted by Edwin Landseer in his painting Scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, based on A Midsummer Night’s Dream act IV, scene I, with Bottom and fairies in attendance.

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire !
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon’s sphere ;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green ;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be ;
In their gold coats spots you see ;
Those be rubies, fairy favours ;
In those freckles live their savours ;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip’s ear.

By William Shakespeare

image

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them ;
The good is oft interred with their bones ;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious :
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest-
For Brutus is an honourable man ;
So are they all, all honourable men –
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me :
But Brutus says he was ambitious ;
And Brutus is an honourable man.

He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill :
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious ?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept :
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff :
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious ;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse : was this ambition ?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious ;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.

I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause :
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him ?
O judgment ! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me ;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

                       

By William Shakespeare

image

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them ;
The good is oft interred with their bones ;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious :
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest-
For Brutus is an honourable man ;
So are they all, all honourable men –
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me :
But Brutus says he was ambitious ;
And Brutus is an honourable man.

He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill :
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious ?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept :
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff :
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious ;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse : was this ambition ?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious ;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.

I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause :
What cause withholds you then, to mourn for him ?
O judgment ! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me ;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.

                       

Poem By William Shakespeare

image

“Romeo and Juliet” (1884) By Sir Frank Bernard Dicksee 

TAKE, O take those lips away
That so sweetly were forsworn,
And those eyes, the break of day,
Lights that do mislead the morn :
But my kisses bring again,
Bring again —
Seals of love, but seal’d in vain,
Seal’d in vain !

Poem By William Shakespeare

image

“Romeo and Juliet” (1884) By Sir Frank Bernard Dicksee 

TAKE, O take those lips away
That so sweetly were forsworn,
And those eyes, the break of day,
Lights that do mislead the morn :
But my kisses bring again,
Bring again —
Seals of love, but seal’d in vain,
Seal’d in vain !

Poem by William Shakespeare

image

Blow, blow, thou winter wind
Thou art not so unkind
As man’s ingratitude ;
Thy tooth is not so keen,
Because thou art not seen,
Although thy breath be rude.

Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly :
Most friendship if feigning, most loving mere folly :
Then heigh-ho, the holly !
This life is most jolly.

Freeze, freeze thou bitter sky,
That does not bite so nigh
As benefits forgot :
Though thou the waters warp,
Thy sting is not so sharp
As a friend remembered not.

Heigh-ho ! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly :
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly :
Then heigh-ho, the holly !
This life is most jolly.