Category: not shakespeare

scripps: new and improved Definitive chart tha…

scripps:

new and improved Definitive chart thanks to @thinkofaugust

Regular

magicalballerinaprincess:

biggest-gaudiest-patronuses:

one-hell-of-a-sheep:

why does oscar wilde take 150 pages to write something he could literally say in a paragraph

gay

compelling argument

Regular

throughthewildblue:

27teacups:

saoirseronanswife:

“in this essay i will explore” memes piss me off because it implies y’all still using first person pronouns when writing academically. childish ass

feigning authorial distance is a coward’s move. get in the fucking pit and fight for your argument

the real crime is using the superfluous phrase “in this essay”

secretmellowblog: Sydney Carton doodles…I don…

secretmellowblog:

Sydney Carton doodles…I don’t know what’s more of a mess, his life or his hair

Regular

jstor:

words-writ-in-starlight:

dukeofbookingham:

jstor:

enemy0gene:

justsomeantifas:

ughcentral:

justsomeantifas:

funnyfoxes55:

justsomeantifas:

marquisnaberius:

justsomeantifas:

when you claim capitalism spreads knowledge but it throws everything in academic research behind a paywall

image

@jstor

@jstor

@jstor

@jstor

@jstor

@jstor

@jstor

We can address this! First, friendly reminder – JSTOR is not a publisher and is a non-profit organization. We work with publishers to digitize and make searchable their copyrighted work, so we do not own any of the content that is on JSTOR. But!  did you know that JSTOR has worked with our publishing partners to make that content available in a variety of ways for those not at higher ed institutions? 

1. Graduated? Graduating? Check to see if your uni offers alumni access here.

2. We offer free online reading programs. Sign up for a MyJSTOR account and you can read up to three articles online every two weeks. More info on how to register here.  

3. Open Access content – everything published prior to 1925 in the U.S. and 1870 abroad is free to read and download.  Additionally, there are more than 500 open access ebooks and a number of open access journal articles that publishers have made available. You can find these by performing a search and then, on the results page, in the left-hand side bar, scroll down and click “Read and Download” while you are not logged in.

4. Many public libraries offer access to JSTOR – check with yours. NYPL and BPL are two that do off the top of my head. 

5. JSTOR Daily is our online magazine – outside authors write articles on a number of topics but must cite their sources from articles on JSTOR! And we link to and open the articled that are cited in each story. So, you can read the short version and explore the research that supports it. 

I hope this is helpful!

Heads up, kids

This is excellent information but I’m dying to know….

Why is @jstor better about responding to complaints than @staff?

OH HEY, THIS AGAIN. 

Update! Tech recently made a change where ALL OF THE OPEN ACCESS CONTENT ON JSTOR IS SEARCHABLE WITHOUT A LOGIN. 

This now includes 2,700 ebooks (up from 500 when we originally reblogged this) and something like 500,000 open articles (keep in mind though, most of these are published pre-1925). There are 19 open access journals that are still posting their work on JSTOR too. 

ANYWAY, this is all FREELY SEARCHABLE WITHOUT A LOGIN. GO HERE: http://www.jstor.org/open/ 

Regular

My thearpist is going to send a note on my behalf to a psychiatrist saying that there is no doubt that I have depression and generalized anxiety disorder and thus I need medication for it. I am so happy that I’m going to get prescribed medication to even out my brain chemicals and turn my life around as much as I can right now. I needed this for a very long time and I’m getting not only a place to speak about my issues, but getting my brain to balance itself out. The beginning of June cannot come soon enough.

Regular

pagesinmylife:

I keep buying books because in the future I’m gonna have a kickass library with two floors and a fireplace so I need to start collecting books to fill it with

Regular

After a couple of years debating this internally, I can say now that I am demiromantic, romantic orientation wise (my sexual and romantic orientations differ from one another). I am so happy because for a long time, I felt like I was “broken” for not falling for someone romantically in a short period of time. I thought that I just needed to not be so “picky.” While I validated other demiromantic folks, I didn’t validate myself. I always told myself that I would “snap out of it.”

Not anymore.

My romantic orientation is demiromantic. And I feel liberated to admit this.